CMDS is one of the leading centers of research on media, communication, and information policy in Europe.  Based in the School of Public Policy at Central European University, we produce scholarly and practice-oriented research addressing academic, policy and civil society needs. In September 2014, we adopted a new name, and you can read more about our transition here

Featured Publications

Philip N. Howard: Pax Technica: How the Internet of Things May Lock Us Up or Set Us Free

April 10, 2015

Should we fear or welcome the internet’s evolution? The “internet of things” is the rapidly growing network of everyday objects—eyeglasses, cars, thermostats—made smart with sensors and internet addresses. Soon we will live in a pervasive yet invisible network of everyday objects that communicate with one another. In this original and provocative book, Director of CMDS, Philip N. Howard envisions a new world order emerging from this great transformation in the technologies around us.

Monroe Price: Free Expression, Globalism and the New Strategic Communication

January 29, 2015

Building on examples drawn from the Arab Spring, the shaping of the Internet in China, Iran's perception of foreign broadcasting, and Russia's media interventions, Monroe Price's book, Free Expression, Globalism and the New Strategic Communication, published by Cambridge University Press, exposes the anxieties of loss of control, on the one hand, and the missed opportunities for greater freedom, on the other. 

Gina Neff: Venture Labor: Work and the Burden of Risk in Innovative Industries (new paperback edition)

January 19, 2015

In the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, employees of Internet startups took risks--left well-paying jobs for the chance of striking it rich through stock options (only to end up unemployed a year later), relocated to areas that were epicenters of a booming industry (that shortly went bust), chose the opportunity to be creative over the stability of a set schedule.

Anya Schiffrin: Global Muckraking - 100 Years of Investigative Journalism from Around the World

July 15, 2014

From Sinclair Lewis to Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, crusading journalists have played a central role in American politics: checking abuses of power, revealing corporate misdeeds, and exposing government corruption. Muckraking journalism is part and parcel of American democracy.

Dean Starkman: The Watchdog That Didn't Bark

January 7, 2014

In this sweeping, incisive study, Dean Starkman exposes the critical shortcomings that softened coverage during the mortgage era and the years leading up to the financial collapse of 2008. He locates the roots of the problem in business news’s origin as a market messaging service geared toward investors in the early twentieth century. This access-dependent strain of journalism was opposed by the grand, sweeping work of the muckrakers.

State Power 2.0: Authoritarian Entrenchment and Political Engagement Worldwide

December 2, 2013

Digital media and online social networking applications have changed the way in which dissent is organized with social movement leaders using online applications and digital content systems to organize collective action, activate local protest groups, network with international social movements and share their political perspectives. In the past, authoritarian regimes could control broadcast media in times of political crisis by destroying newsprint supplies, seizing radio and television stations, and blocking phone calls.

Upcoming Events

Monday April 20

Tuesday April 21

Phil Howard
12:30pm
April 21, 2015

Thursday April 23

Phil Howard
4:30pm
April 23, 2015

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